First Scots Presbyterian Church 


First Scots Presbyterian Church Charleston

First Scots Presbyterian Church, constructed in 1814, is the fifth oldest church in Charleston. The congregation dates to 1731 and the current church is the second on the site. The first church was finished in 1734 and used for worship until the current church was built. Church services were halted during both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. The church was severely damaged by a hurricane in 1885 and the Great Charleston Earthquake the following year. Presbyterians from the North assisted in repairing the First Scots after both of these natural disasters. The church has two bell towers, but the bells were donated to the military during the Civil War. In 1999, an English bell made in 1814 was hung in the North tower. The church’s graveyard contains more than 50 stones that date earlier than 1800. Notable features of the church include twin towers that rise above a columned portico, the seal of the Church of Scotland displayed in the stained glass window over the main entrance, and the decorative wrought iron grilles contain thistles which are the symbol of Scotland.



First Scots Presbyterian Church Photos


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First Scots Presbyterian Church Charleston
First Scots Presbyterian Church Charleston
First Scots Presbyterian Church Charleston

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First Scots Presbyterian Church Charleston
First Scots Presbyterian Church Charleston
First Scots Presbyterian Church Charleston

First Scots Presbyterian Church Address and Map


First Scots Presbyterian Church
53 Meeting St
Charleston SC 29401
(843) 722-8882
First Scots Presbyterian Church


First Scots Presbyterian Church 
Worship Schedule


Summer 
Sunday 10 am

Mid September - May
Sunday 8:45 am and 10 am



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