McLeod Plantation


McLeod Plantation

Established in 1851, this 37-acre plantation is a significant Gullah/Geechee heritage site located on James Island. The McLeod plantation house, built in 1858, is a raised two-story clapboard structure. The plantation grounds include slave cabins, a detached kitchen, a gin house, a barn, a carriage house, and gardens. The property has served in many capacities over the years including a Confederacy Hospital, a burial ground for slaves and Union soldiers, and a headquarters office for the Freedmen's Bureau. Visitors can also view the McLeod Oak which is believed to be more than 600 years old. The property was bought by the Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commision in 2010 and was opened to the public in 2015. Included in the admission is a 45-minute guided tour and access to the first floor of the main house.



McLeod Plantation Photos


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McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation

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McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation
McLeod Plantation

McLeod Plantation Hours and Admission


Hours:
Tuesday - Sunday 9 am - 4 pm
Open Memorial Day and Labor Day

Admission:
Adults (13+) $20
Seniors (60+) $15
Child (3-12) $6
Children 2 and under Free

Included in admission are guided interpretive tours offered at 9:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., and 2:30 p.m.


McLeod Plantation Address and Map


McLeod Plantation
325 Country Club Dr
Charleston SC 29412
(843) 762-9514
McLeod Plantation Website
McLeod Plantation Park Map


Current and Upcoming Events
at the McLeod Plantation


What: Poetry at McLeod:Terry Ellen Cross Davis
When: May 29, 2021
Time: 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Where: McLeod Plantation Historic Site 
Admission: Free to the first 50 participants, thereafter free with park admission.

In this innovative series, African American poets reclaim the plantation landscape by exploring the past, present, future, and the imagined in their own voices. Often representing pain, suffering, survival, and perseverance, these poets confirm that plantations are places of conscience. One poet recalled, "Reading poems where my ancestors were was a return. On their behalf I was returning with power. It belongs to them. I would be a part of reclaiming it." 


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