Cathedral of St. Luke
and St. Paul Charleston


Cathedral of St Luke and St Paul Charleston

Construction on The Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul in Charleston began in 1810. It was originally called St. Paul’s Radcliffeboro until 1949 when the parish enfolded the congregation of St. Luke's on Charlotte Street. The first combined service of the two parishes took place on July 17, 1949. The building was in continuous use during the Civil War, harboring congregations that were being bombarded by Union cannons. The church’s bell was dismantled and sent to Columbia to be melted down and used to support the Confederate cause. For the most part, the interior appears much as it did in 1815, a major exception being the stained-glass windows that were added after Hurricane Hugo in 1989. Notable features include the buildings acoustical properties that are often sought by performing artists, particularly during the Spoleto Festival. 



Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul Charleston Photos


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Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul Charleston
Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul Charleston
Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul Charleston
Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul Charleston

Click Photos to Enlarge

Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul Charleston
Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul Charleston
Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul Charleston
Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul Charleston

Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul Charleston Address and Map


Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul 
126 Coming St
Charleston SC 29403
(843) 722-7345
Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul


Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul
Worship Schedule


Sunday:
8:00 am - Classic Anglican
10:30 am - Historic Common Worship


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